TONES AND I ~ LyricsBot


chat with TONES AND I’s lyrics

This is not the official site, tonesandi.com. This unofficial site has squeezed Toni’s lyrics into a chatbot that will turn your conversation on its head. Try to spot the song it’s quoting...

Enter anything in the ChatBot below

  • The replies don't always make sense but that's the fun in it - make your own meaning.
  • Try to guess which song they are from or...

copy and paste the reply back into the ChatBot if you want to know the answer


Also available on Facebook: @TonesAndILyricsBot [Send Message] or m.me/TonesAndILyricsBot

TONES AND I LyricsBot - Privacy and Terms of Service

Acknowledgments: Toni Watson


Sample Interaction

TONES-AND-I-LyricsBot:
Jimmy would come over after school sometimes

User:
Hi

TONES-AND-I-LyricsBot:
My only friends have been online

User:
What's your name?
TONES-AND-I-LyricsBot:
Got my dreams by my side
User:
Where do you work?

TONES-AND-I-LyricsBot:
I don't know why I'm here

User:
What is the most important thing in life?

TONES-AND-I-LyricsBot:
I realise I don't know where I'm going

User:
Are you a dance monkey?

TONES-AND-I-LyricsBot:
"Dance Monkey"
(feat. Major Lazer)

They say, oh my god, I see the way you shine
Take your hands, my dear, and place them both in mine
You know you stopped me dead while I was passing by
And now I beg to see you dance just one more time
Ooh I see you, see you, see you every time
And, oh my, I, I, I like your style
You, you make me, make me, make me wanna cry
And now I beg to see you dance just one more time

So they say
Dance for me
Dance for me
Dance for me oh oh oh
I've never seen anybody do the things you do before
They say
Move for me
Move for me
Move for me ay ay ay
And when you're done, I'll make you do it all again

I said, oh my god, I see you walking by
Take my hands, my dear, and look me in my eyes
Just like a monkey I've been dancing my whole life
But you just beg to see me dance just one more time
Ooh I see you, see you, see you every time
And, oh my, I, I, I,
I like your style
You, you make me, make me, make me wanna cry
And now I beg to see you dance just one more time

So they say
Dance for me
Dance for me
Dance for me oh oh oh
I've never seen anybody do the things you do before
They say
Move for me
Move for me
Move for me ay ay ay
And when you're done I'll make you do it all again

They say
Dance for me
Dance for me
Dance for me oh oh oh
I've never seen anybody do the things you do before
They say
Move for me
Move for me
Move for me ay ay ay
And when you're done I'll make you do it all again

They say
Dance for me
Dance for me
Dance for me oh oh oh
I've never seen anybody do the things you do before
They say
Move for me
Move for me
Move for me ay ay ay
And when you're done I'll make you do it all again
They say
Dance for me
Dance for me
Dance for me oh oh oh
I've never seen anybody do the things you do before
They say
Move for me
Move for me
Move for me ay ay ay
And when you're done I'll make you do it all again
All again





More Music Reviews:
https://www.triplejunearthed.com/user/4209906/my-reviews




Seven Theories On Why We Evolved To Love Music

1. To Get The Girl. “What brings anyone anywhere? Why do men build bridges, why are there jets? I was hoping to have sex tonight.” This insight comes from the brilliantly warped mind of Jack Donaghy, a character on NBC’s 30 Rock. Darwin’s theory of sexual selection is grounded in a similar ideology. For the same reason that men flex their muscles or shower or even get up in the morning, they play music to get girls. Said Darwin: “Primeval man probably first used his voice in producing true musical cadences as do some of the gibbon-apes at the present day; and we may conclude…that this power would have been especially exerted during the courtship of the sexes.”

2. To Keep In Synch. Have you ever noticed that when you walk with someone, you synchronize your footsteps with theirs? The subconscious need to walk in rhythm served an evolutionary function for our ancestors. When humans walk, we make noise. For early humans, that was a problem. The sound of footsteps could potentially mask the sound of a predatory animal or other sounds signaling danger. Our ancestors may have learned to synchronize their steps in order to create predictable sounds as a group, improving their ability to recognize external rhythms.

3. To Identify Your Tribe. Most athletic events begin with a song. Most teams have a chant that fans use to identify themselves as fans. According to the “adaptionist” theory of evolutionary musicology, these fans may be doing the same thing that coyotes do when they howl in the woods: maintaining their status as part of the pack.

4. To Maximize Flow. If you’ve ever lost yourself on the dance floor or ignored a green light due to excessive singing along, you’ll understand this perspective on music evolution. Instead of sexual selection, Marcus holds that over time, innovative musicians have evolved their understanding of what makes human beings tick, reverse-engineering the human psyche to enhance the sheer joy of music. Eventually, musicians developed a taste for what psychologist Csíkszentmihályi Mihály called “flow” – a joyful state of immersion, wherein one loses all sense of time.

5. To Feel Emotions. Music and language have a lot in common. As Gary Marcus told us, both are infinitely generative systems. Learn a finite number of words, and you can create an infinite number of sentences. Marcus also identified one important distinction between the two: “Music is much more emotional than language.” Some scientists (not Marcus) theorize that music and language evolved from a common “musiclanguage” ancestor, with music evolving to tackle emotional meaning and language evolving to handle referential meaning.

6. To Intimidate Predators. When our evolutionary ancestors descended from the trees, they discovered a new kind of risk in ground predators. Evolutionary musicologist Dr. Joseph Jordania suggests that “rhythmically well-organized loud noise” – the predecessor of choral singing – was initially established as a means to intimidate large ground predators in the African savannah.

7. Survival of the Funkiest. This one’s fresh out of the oven, but interesting to consider. If Darwinism explains the organic world of animals, plants, and other organisms, why can’t it explain human culture? That’s the idea behind DarwinTunes, a project that tasks participants with selecting songs and “mating” them with other tunes to create “music offspring.” If the offspring are selected by other players, they “survive” and the music “species” lives on. The project is rooted in the theory of “cultural evolution,” the idea that people copy cultural artifacts – from words to songs to visuals – from other people. Each time an artifact is copied, it is mutated. Most die, but some are successful. These catch on and become a success, the victors of cultural evolution.

Source: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/blogs/secretlife/blogposts/the-evolution-of-music/

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